Adult Stem Cell Awareness

March 28, 2008

Noah, the former embryo, is in the news

Filed under: Uncategorized — benotafraid @ 5:32 pm
Tags: ,

_42459387_noahmother_ap_203body.jpg

This gorgeous baby boy was rescued from the ravages of Hurricane Katrina. It was a compelling story then, because at the time, Noah was a frozen embryo. Perhaps some were flabbergasted that rational people would risk their own lives to save a mere embryo. Yet Noah’s parents knew that Noah was no less their baby then, as an embryo, than they hoped he would one day be, held in their arms.

Noah turned 1 yr old in January!

CBN (Christian Broadcast News) just ran a great piece about Noah. They have interviewed Robert P. George, author,¬†ethicist, and advisor for the President’s Council on Bioethics. They touch on stem cell research and the canonically¬†controversial topic of embryo adoption. Read Survival Tale of an Embryo Called ‘Noah’.

Hat tip to Spirit Daily.

Advertisements

4 Comments »

  1. Certainly an inspiring story. But certainly the parents had several other blastocysts in storage at this facility, and the child is the product of only one of them. You do recognize this inconvenient fact, don’t you?

    Comment by winnowhead — March 10, 2009 @ 5:14 am | Reply

    • I doubt that. If they risked their lives for one, they would have risked their lives for others. And therefore, no, it’s not an inconvenient fact because it doesn’t make sense that they would risk their lives for one embryo if they knew they had others.

      Yet, even so, do you think there is much merit in criticizing the family for saving the child that they could save, if for, whatever reasons, they could not save others?

      Shrug. There are plenty of people out there driving the indusrty of embryo production and the commoditization of children. I’d much rather go after them.

      Comment by benotafraid — March 10, 2009 @ 12:03 pm | Reply

  2. Everyone who uses fertility clinics have multiple eggs fertilized, because there is a high failure rate. According to this, there is a success rate of 35% with in vitro fertilization. My point was simply that, according to logic like yours, everyone who who becomes pregnant with IVF is ultimately a murderer because 100% of the embryos aren’t viable – and this is known going into the procedure.

    Comment by winnowhead — March 14, 2009 @ 5:10 pm | Reply

    • Being Catholic, no I do not think IVF is a morally permissable way to co-create. I am not the one to judge what level of complicity and culpablity parents have when some embryos are not used. Obviously some have the choice to have all embryos implanted (see “octamom”, for example). Some have the choice of having the others frozen and perhaps in their minds, they intend to use them. It’s also not easy to judge their cupability when some that are implanted do not make it. The intent was to have a baby, not kill a baby.

      So, when YOU say that those who use IVF are murderers, that is your conclusion alone. Shrug.

      My position, as I’ve already briefly discussed, is that it is the “industy” and those who profit who are largely to blame. They prey on the misery of infertile parents. Society as a whole generates the idea that we are “entitled” to become biological parents (even if you are 60). So, truly, it’s no wonder that many turn to ivf. But there is no doubt that ivf fuels the embryonic stem cell research industry – something not unknown and unappreciated by fertility clinics.

      In posting this story, I was simply pointing out that the same “product” – an embryo – is at once someone worth dying for, and at the same time considered by others, something worthy of killing. It illustrates the confused and conflicted status the human embryo holds in our society.

      Comment by benotafraid — March 14, 2009 @ 6:35 pm | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: